Stormwater Program

Mission

To ensure the environmental integrity of the campus stormwater system by addressing flood, water quality, and erosion control.

To work hand-in-hand with members of the campus community through education and outreach programs.

To inspire and encourage proactive involvement by setting a positive example through leadership in developing innovative solutions to our campus environmental concerns.

Introduction

The Arizona State University Stormwater Management Program and Illicit Discharge Detection and Elimination Plan are in general conformance with the Arizona Department of Environmental Quality, Arizona Pollutant Discharge Elimination System General Permit Number AZG2016-002 for Stormwater Discharges from the Small ASU Separate Storm Sewer Systems at the three ASU campuses: Tempe, Polytechnic and West. The Permit was issued by the Arizona Department of Environmental Quality effective Sept. 30, 2016. ASU submitted the Notice of Intent, and prepared and implemented the Stormwater Management Program in accordance with Sections 2 and 5 of the Permit.

In response to concern over the pollution of America’s waterways, Congress passed the Clean Water Act in 1972. The Clean Water Act is the primary federal law that protects our nation’s surface water bodies or waters of the United States. Polluted stormwater runoff was addressed specifically under the Clean Water Act by a two-phase program that relies on the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permit coverage. 

In 1990, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency implemented Phase I of the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System Stormwater Program under the Clean Water Act. Phase I relies on National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permit coverage to address stormwater runoff pollution from medium and large municipal separate storm sewer systems generally serving populations of 100,000 or greater, construction activities disturbing 5 acres of land or greater and 10 categories of industrial activities.

To expand the protection of water bodies and promote cleaner water, Phase II Final Rule was published in 40 Code of Federal Regulation on Dec. 8, 1999. This rule extends the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permit coverage to include Small Separate Storm Sewer Systems serving urbanized areas with residential populations of at least 50,000 with an overall density of at least 1,000 people per square mile and small construction activities.  Public universities are included in the Phase II Final Rule under 40 Code of Federal Regulation 122.26 (b)(16)(iii), as “…systems similar to separate storm sewer systems in public areas such as systems at military bases, large hospitals or prison complexes…” and therefore is required to comply with Phase II Final Rule requirements.  The goals of Phase II Final Rule are similar to the Phase I program, which are to reduce the discharge of pollutants to the maximum extent practicable, protect water quality and satisfy the water quality requirements of the Clean Water Act.  On Dec. 5, 2002, EPA Region 9 approved the State of Arizona’s Pollutant Discharge Elimination System Program pursuant to Section 402 of the Clean Water Act. 

The Arizona Department of Environmental Quality has primacy and administers the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination program in Arizona through the Arizona Pollutant Discharge Elimination System program. ASU submitted its original Notice of Intent application to the Arizona Department of Environmental Quality prior to the March 29, 2017 deadline.  By submitting the Notice of Intent, ASU effectively applied for coverage under Permit No. AZG2016-002. ASU’s original Stormwater Management Program dated March 2003 and revisions dated July 2006, September 2008 and March 2011 were submitted to the Arizona Department of Environmental Quality as part of the general permit requirements.

Arizona Department of Environmental Quality Construction General Permit: The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency regulates stormwater discharges from construction sites. Arizona was given authorization from the Environmental Protection Agency to operate the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System Permit Program on the state level on Dec. 5, 2002. The Arizona Pollutant Discharge Elimination System was expanded to address stormwater discharges from construction activities.

ASU’s Capital Programs Management Group oversees construction projects and administers the Arizona Pollutant Discharge Elimination System construction general permit requirements. To reduce construction site runoff, operators of construction sites that disturb one or more acres through clearing, grading and excavating are required to submit a Notice of Intent for coverage under the Arizona Construction General Permit AZG2013-001 and a Stormwater Pollution Prevention Plan to the Arizona Department of Environmental Quality. The University Erosion, Sediment Control and Grading Policy is addressed during plan review and during construction. Stormwater Inspections are performed regularly. Contractors shall post an approved Arizona Department of Environmental Quality Authorization Certificate and retain a copy of the Stormwater Pollution Prevention Plan at the construction site. Contractors are to observe ASU’s Stormwater Management Construction Site Procedures for Contractors.

To terminate permit coverage on projects permitted under the Arizona General Permit for Stormwater Discharges Associated with Construction Activity AZG2013-001, a completed Notice of Termination form is submitted to the Arizona Department of Environmental Quality after the following conditions have been met: surface area stabilization, temporary erosion/sediment controls removed and discharges from construction area eliminated.

The following information will assist contractors to obtain coverage under Arizona’s General Permit No. AZG2013-001:

Arizona Department of Environmental Quality
Arizona State University

 

Name Title | Responsibility  Department Phone
Kenneth Lufkin Assistant Director | Supervises Stormwater Management Program Capital Programs Management Group 480-727-4501
Lynn Favour Program Manager | Oversees Stormwater Management Program, stormwater construction documentation, drywell installation permitting, drywell registrations and annual inspections CPMG, Construction Support Services 480-727-0918
Tom Lyons Director | Receives illicit discharge reports and refers to proper authority Facilities Management, Polytechnic  480-727-1115
John Herrera Director | Receives illicit discharge reports and refers to proper authority Facilities Management, West  602-543-3208
Suzanne Kennedy Associate Director | Oversees EHS illicit discharge reporting and investigations Environmental Health and Safety 480-965-1893
Henry Walsh Manager | Receives illicit discharge reports and investigates, manages emergency cleanup and documents investigations Environmental Health and Safety 480-965-8554
E.L. Cortez Director | Receives illicit discharge reports and refers to proper authority Facilities Management, Residential Life 480-965-2720
Ray Humbert Associate Director | Oversees consultant responsible for visually inspecting and cleaning parking lots Parking and Transit Services 480-965-9297
Tim Smith Interim Director | Identifies and maps stormwater drainage systems Asset Management 480-727-1086

 

For other questions or concerns, please email ASU’s Stormwater Management Program

Stormwater is the flow of water generated from rainfall events. Rain water is either absorbed into the ground, evaporates or is stormwater runoff, which is a leading cause of pollution to surface waters.

When rainfall flows over land surfaces and impervious areas such as driveways, sidewalks and streets, the storwater picks up dirt, litter, and an assortment of other pollutants. The water then is diverted into storm drains to prevent road and property flooding where it discharges untreated into retention basins, parks, streams, rivers and lakes.

Where there is more impervious surfaces, there will be more stormwater runoff.  Pollution prevention is the key to decreasing stormwater source pollution and you can begin with simple but important steps:

Construction sites

Before beginning an outdoor project, locate the nearest storm drains and protect them from debris and other materials. Sweep up and properly dispose of construction debris such as concrete and mortar. Clean up paint spills and dispose of waste safety. Store substances properly to avoid leaks and spills.

Lawn and garden

When watering, make sure that you apply just enough water without allowing excess water to flow down the driveway or into the street. Water flowing over the land picks up an array of contaminants. Limit the use of pesticides and herbicides. When use is necessary, use these chemicals in the recommended amounts. Avoid application if the forecast calls for rain; otherwise, chemicals will be washed you’re your local stream. Sweep up yard debris, rather than hosing down areas. Compost or recycle yard waste when possible. Cover piles of dirt and mulch being used in landscaping projects to prevent these pollutants from blowing or washing off your yard into local waterbodies. Vegetate bare spots in your yard to prevent soil erosion.

Pet care

Pick up pet waste and dispose of it properly. Leaving pet waste on the ground increases public health risks by allowing harmful bacteria to wash into the storm drain and eventually into local waterbodies.

Report illegal dumping

If you see illegal dumping, see spill reporting information.

Swimming pools

Drain your pool into the sanitary sewer system. Properly store pool and spa chemicals to prevent leaks and spills.

Vehicle and garage

Check your car, motorcycle and other machinery and equipment for leaks and spills. Maintain your vehicle to be leak free and make repairs as soon as possible to keep automotive fluids off of paved areas. Clean up spilled fluids with an absorbent material and don’t rinse the spills into a nearby storm drain. Recycle used oil and other automotive fluids at participating service stations. Don’t dump these chemicals down the storm drain or dispose of them in your trash.

ASU owns and operates state-owned storm sewer systems which are similar to separate storm sewer systems in municipalities; therefore, it meets the definition of a Non-Traditional Small MS4. The Stormwater Management Program describes the policies and procedures ASU implements to reduce, to the maximum extent practicable, pollutant discharges to and from the MS4. The overall goal of the program is to ensure that discharges from the MS4 do not cause or contribute to exceedances of surface water quality standards.

ASU has developed best management practices for the six minimum control measures to reduce the discharge of pollutants:

  1. Public Education and Outreach

  2. Public Involvement and Participation

  3. Illicit Discharge Detection and Elimination

  4. Construction Activity Stormwater Runoff Control

  5. Post-Construction Stormwater Management in New Development and Redevelopment

  6. Pollution Prevention and Good Housekeeping for ASU Operations

MS4 documents
Illicit Discharge Detection and Elimination Plan

The Illicit Discharge Detection and Elimination Plan in conjunction with ASU’s Stormwater Mangement Program includes policies and processes to systematically find and eliminate sources of non-stormwater to its storm sewer system and to implement procedures to prevent illicit connections and discharges.  Pollution prevention is a strong component of all ASU activities and employee training; therefore, pollution prevention is evident throughout multiple ASU campus operations and maintenance departments including Capital Programs Management Group, Environmental Health and Safety, Facilities Management, Grounds Services and Parking and Transit Services.

Hazardous material spills and releases
Non-hazardous incidents